Tagged: Jason Bay

Place Your Bets

Is Jason Bay healthy? As you all probably know by now, it was reported
recently that back in June, Bay had agreed upon a deal with the Red Sox, but the
deal was later nixed due to medical reasons related to his knees. Jason Bay, on the
other hand, insisted he was perfectly fine.

This leaves me to wonder – if there was something that the Red Sox doctors noticed,
why did the Mets doctors give him a clean bill of health? Maybe the 2009 Mets
season can shed some light on the situation:

Oliver Perez

Ryan Church

Jonathon Niese

Fernando Nieve

  • Carlos Delgado – Hip Soreness – Out May 11-15, Season Ending Hip
    Surgery
  • Jose Reyes – Right Calf Injury – Out May 14-18, May 22-25, Season
    Ending Hamstring Tear
  • Ramon Martinez – Fractured Pinkie Finger – Out June 3-Season
  • J.J. Putz – Bone Spurs in Throwing Elbow – Out June 5, Season Ending
    Elbow Surgery
  • Fernando Martinez – Knee Inflamation – Out July 4-8, Season Ending
    Knee Surgery
  • Oliver Perez – Tendinitis – June 12-July 7, August 26-31, Season Ending
    Elbow Surgery
  • Alex Cora – (Starts season with thumb injuries) – Torn Ligament in Thumb
    – Out May 18-June 3, August 15, Season Ending Surgery on both thumbs
  • Fernando Nieve – Injured Quad – Out July 19-Season
  • Johan Santana – (Elbow concern in Spring Training) – Out August 20,
    Season Ending Elbow Surgery
  • Jonathon Niese – Torn Hamstring – Out August 6-Season
  • John Maine – Shoulder Weakness – Out June 12-September 12
  • Angel Pagan – Throwing Elbow – Out Spring Training-May 9, Right Groin
    Strain – Out June 1-July 10
  • Carlos Beltran – Bone Bruise In Knee – Out June 22-September 6
  • Gary Sheffield – Sore Hamstring – Out July 18-August 1, August 6-9,
    August 25-September 15 (Pinch Hitting Occasionally)
  • Brian Schneider – Back / Calf Strain – Out April 16-May 29
  • Tim Redding – Shoulder Weakness – Out Spring Training-May 17
  • Ryan Church – Pulled Hamstring – Out May 23-June 6

That list doesn’t include injuries such as David Wright‘s injury from being hit
by a Matt Cain fastball, or minor day-to-day injuries.

Maybe it’s just me, but I wouldn’t trust the Mets’ medical staff.

If you don’t agree with me, or feel that maybe the Mets’ doctors and management
should be given a little more credit, the precedent doesn’t look good for you. If you
recall, this same situation once happened with a player going from the Red Sox to
the Mets via free agency. Any guesses as to who I’m referring to?

Pedro Martinez

After the 2004 season, The Red Sox decided to wave goodbye to Pedro
Martinez
, allowing him to sign a $53MM deal with the Mets. Why did Sox
management allow him to get away? They felt that after the 2005 season, Pedro’s
skills would start to decrease and he would fall from his alter. In 2005, Pedro went
15-8 over 31 starts with a 2.82 ERA, with an appearance at the All-Star Game. After
that, a freak injury against the Marlins in 2006. A recovery, then late in the same
season, season ending rotator cuff surgery. Flirtation with retirement in the
offseason. A surprising return in September 2007. An injury plagued, 5-6 2008. No
serious suitors as a free agent in the following offseason. A late entrance into 2009
with the Phillies, followed closely by a miserable Game 6 in the World Series. Hardly
an arm worth $53MM.

Looks to me like the Mets’ medical team consists of the kind of people that could
miss a knee injury in the making.

Just sayin’.

I’ve got my money on a Jason Bay knee injury before 2012. How about you?

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Kudos to Epstein

Epstein’s To Do List for this off-season:

  • Deepen Rotation – DONE
  • Increase Outfield Defense – DONE
  • Improve Bullpen – Incomplete
  • Increase Infield Defense – Incomplete? Maybe Not

Adrian Beltre

Okay, so he solved the first issue on the list with John Lackey. The second
issue on the list was rectified with Mike Cameron, effectively replacing Jason
Bay’s defensive prowess, and then some. The third point may not have a
solution. After losing Billy Wagner and Takashi Saito, it’s hard to
imagine a bullpen as strong as it was late in 2009. But, Epstein went after low risk
players like Boof Bonser, and by extending the rotation, perhaps one of the
6 starters could find time in the bullpen. As for the final issue on Epstein’s mind, he
solved half the problem with the signing of Marco Scutaro. Now, just as we
were thinking that maybe we had to hope for Mike Lowell‘s health, it appears
that perhaps our infield picture is coming into focus, as reports are stating that the
Sox are close to bringing Adrian Beltre to town on a one year contract worth
about $9-10MM with a possible option for 2011.

I like this deal. It means we don’t have to rely on Lowell, but we keep a strong
defense and strong bat that Lowell used to provide. We keep a strong defense at
third without losing any power. Furthermore, Beltre comes relatively cheap, and with
just a one year contract, could open the door for Adrian Gonzalez when the
Padres become a little more desperate to trade him (say, next off-season, perhaps?)

Now we just need to figure out the bullpen.

It’s All Over

Jason Bay

Finally, everything’s finished. I can finally start relaxing thanks to the end of the
Christmas holidays! The family has gone home. The cooking and baking is done.
The shopping is over (including all the boxing-week shopping I plan on doing). The
house is quiet The decorations are put away.

Today also marks the end of a weekend without Internet access. It was a terribly
boring weekend without the pleasures of Twitter, MLBlogs, and the like. However, I
still had my BlackBerry (thankfully) to keep me remotely sane … Seems Windows 7
isn’t infallible after all. Drat. Hopefully I can find the time this week to catch up on
what I missed with all of you around here.

Lastly, if the rumors from MLB Trade
Rumors
are accurate, today also marks the end of the Jason Bay fiasco:

1:13pm: WFAN’s Mike Francesa says the Mets will announce a Jason Bay
signing early next week, if his physical checks out.

1:20pm: SI’s Jon Heyman confirms that the Mets have an agreement with
Bay. MetsBlog’s Matthew Cerrone expects a four-year deal for about $66MM. If
that’s accurate, Bay left Boston for an additional $6MM. As compensation, the Red
Sox will receive the Mets’ second-round pick (currently #50) as well as a
supplemental pick.

1:42pm: Joel Sherman of the New York Post writes that Bay has a four-year,
$66MM agreement with an easy fifth-year vesting option. The 2014 vesting option
appears to be worth more than $14MM, as ESPN’s Jerry Crasnick tweets that Bay’s
deal could be worth “slightly more than $80MM over five years.” Sherman cautions
that Bay’s physical “might not be a formality.”

Finally, the charade is over, and the rumors of Boston reuniting with Bay can finally
cease and desist. Not that I wouldn’t have loved to see Bay in LF in 2010,
even if it meant the potential of Buchholz and Ellsbury going to San Diego, but at
least we can move on and try to focus on other, more important things. Time to go
find a corner infielder. With Mark DeRosa going to San Francisco, and
Nick Johnson joining the Yankees, we’re running out of options.

Jason Bay

Not that it’s a big deal. We could put Kotchman at First or keep Lowell at Third and
still survive.

Okay, so the sarcasm didn’t come through. We might be able to survive. We
just lost our biggest RBI man and slugger. That’s a big blow. Thankfully, he went to
the NL, but still, it is a big blow. I can’t help but wonder if Epstein offered a vesting
option of his own for a 5th year, or if the 4 years / $60MM was as far as he was
willing to go. If it was, perhaps an optional year and $6MM (plus a couple million for
the luxury tax) was the only thing keeping Bay away from us. A pity, really.

Furthermore, we only get a second round draft pick from the Mets (50th overall), as
their first-round draft pick is protected, thanks to their poor performance last year.
So, we lose our best slugger, AND we don’t even get our first round pick for it.

Good luck in New York, Jason. I wish you all the best. I may have spoken ill of you in
the past, but I see now that you just wanted that last year you felt you deserved.
Oftentimes the needs of a business don’t agree with the needs of the individual, and
I am deeply sorrowed that it didn’t work out for you. I always saw you as the man that
changed Boston’s view on great Canadian baseball players. After Eric Gagne’s
failure, I felt it was going to be hard for you to win over the Fenway faithful, but you
were a fan favorite immediately, while filling the biggest shoes possible, and even
when you were slumping in 2009, everyone loved you. I guess strike outs don’t
matter when you knock in over 100 runs and blast over 30 HR. Let me be the first to
say that we’ll all miss #44 in front of the monster, quite dearly. Thanks for all the
great memories! No hard feelings?

P.S. Can I get a farewell hug? Maybe a little peck on the cheek before you move
your life to Manhattan? No? Oh well … I guess dreams really don’t come true, after
all. Then again, mayeb Epstein will do with Bay what Cashman did with Teixeira did
last year. Now THAT would be a dream come true!

Christmas Gets Sweeter? Maybe …

Javier Vazquez

The Yankees are reportedly close to trading Melky Cabrera among others for
Javier Vazquez, from the Braves. Who’s the winner in this deal? Quite possibly the
Red Sox. While Vazquez is a healthy pitcher, and makes a decent #4 in the Yankee
rotation, I can’t help but think that Melky was a better asset for them, not only for
right now, but also the long run.

Vazquez is seasonally a 10-15 game winner who gives up a decent amount of runs,
but is someone who tends to always stay healthy, and eats up innings like a
homeless guy invited to Christmas dinner. But who will the Yankees throw into the
outfield this season? They have Curtis Granderson and Nick Swisher. Granderson
is arguably one of the best center fielders in the game, but Swisher is ranked as average and for some crazy reason is the only Yankee that can’t hit it out of the right field vortex, although defensively he can play anywhere in the outfield, or at first base. Who mans
left field? Does this now mean that they’ll go after Damon if he’s willing to take a pay
decrease? Maybe they give Brett Gardner a chance, or they resign Xavier Nady?
Regardless, I can’t help but think Melky was the best option they had in the outfield
for this coming year, and as a spearhead of the team for the future. Not to mention,
he is/was a fan favorite at Yankee Stadium.

Jacoby Ellsbury

So what does this mean for the Red Sox? With the Yankees bolstering their rotation
further, it gives them a chance to turn Chamberlain or Hughes into a set-up man /
future closer. Getting someone like Vazquez gives them some more flexibility with
their rotation. When the Red Sox signed Cameron and Lackey, they increased their
defensive ability and improved their pitching staff to the point that it was potentially
better than the Yankees. Now, they could be considered equal, meaning the
Yankees have the upper hand with a strong offense. With Jason Bay now with
seemingly no market value, does Epstein put an offer of $60MM / 4 Years back on
the table? It’s obvious Bay is waiting for something from the Sox or another team,
because he clearly doesn’t want to play in Citi Field. And if Epstein was to resign
Bay, it gives him the flexibility to deal Ellsbury to the Padres. As much as I’d hate to
see Ellsbury go, if it means the added power of Bay and Gonzalez, I think I’d
get over it rather quickly. Maybe Vazquez going to the Yanks will push Theo to go
get both Bay and Adrian Gonzalez.

The suspense is killing me …

Greatest Rex Sox Playoff Moments of the Decade

Yes, I know it’s the off-season. Yes, I know the Yankees won the World Series this
year. Yes, I know Papelbon blew up in the ninth and led us to an early exit in the
ALDS. Yes, I know we’re all depressed and hoping for a better result in 2010. But
why not celebrate a bit? Time to cheer up and look at the best playoff plays / games
involving the Red Sox over the past decade.

Jonathan Papelbon

Honorable Mentions:

Nixon Begins the Tradition – The Red Sox found themselves involved in a
pitcher’s duel in Game 3 of the 2003 ALDS against the Oakland Athletics after losing
the first two games in Oakland. Facing Rich Harden in the bottom of the 11th inning,
Trot Nixon came through with a two-run walk-off homer, setting off the Fenway
faithful and keeping the Sox alive to play another day, starting a tradition of
comeback wins the Red Sox became accustomed to for the remainder of the decade.

Ortiz Walks to New York – Everyone thought Anaheim was about to steal the
show in Game 3 of the 2004 ALDS following a Vladimir Guerrero grand slam in the
7th inning that tied the game 6-6. The game went to the bottom of the 10th, where
Mr. Clutch himself hit a two run series-ending home run over the monster to give the
Red Sox a chance to get their revenge against the Yankees.

David Ortiz

Beckett and Pedroia Lead the Way – After a huge comeback series win
against Cleveland, Beckett began the 2007 World Series by striking out the first four
batters he faced in Game 1, and Dustin Pedroia hit an 0-1 count over the Monster
for a lead-off home run. Beckett went on to shut down the Rockies with 9 K’s and
just 1 ER over 7 IP, while the Sox offense never gave up the lead, going on to win
13-1.

Dustin Pedroia

Lester Solidifies His Place as a Fan Favorite – After beating cancer, Jon
Lester came back to the Red Sox in 2007 and eventually went on to beat the
Colorado Rockies in the clinching game of the World Series. While not the most
dominant performance of his career and certainly not his most memorable outing, it
is without a doubt the most important game this young lefty has pitched thus far in
his career, making him a fan favorite in Boston long before he pitched his no-hitter.

And now, for the countdown:

10: Dice-K Hits the Jackpot

2008 ALCS Game 1 – Daisuke Matsuzaka pitched brilliantly on the road in
2008, going 9-0, and he continued that tradition in Tampa against the Rays. In a
pitching duel against James Shields, Dice-K carried a no-hitter through 6 innings,
ultimately striking out 9 over 7+ IP, while Papelbon sealed the deal in the 9th, leading
the Red Sox to a 2-0 shutout.  Unfortunately, the Red Sox were unable to hold
on to the series lead, and lost to the Rays in 7 games.

9: Beckett Keeps the Series Alive

2007 ALCS Game 5 – The Red Sox entered Game 5 at Jacob’s Field on the
brink of elimination. After ex-girlfriend Danielle Peck was invited to sing the national
anthem (supposedly to try to get Beckett off his game), Beckett took the mound
against the Cleveland Indians and their ace, C.C. Sabathia. After giving up an early
1-0 lead in the bottom of the first, Beckett settled in to strike out 11 Cleveland batters
over 7 shutout innings. Jonathan Papelbon shut down the Indians in the 9th, and the
offense routed Sabathia to a 7-1 win, with Beckett at the helm, to keep the dream
alive and take the series back to Fenway.

Regarding Danielle Peck’s Anthem performance:

“She’s a friend of mine. It doesn’t bother me at all. Thanks for flying one of my
friends to the game so she can watch it for free.”


– Josh Beckett


8: Miracle Comeback

2008 ALCS Game 5 – Down 7-0 and facing elimination at home, Pedroia
knocked a single to RF on a 3-2 count with runners on the corners to put the Red
Sox on the board with 2 down in the 7th. The next batter, Ortiz, wrapped a 1-0 count
around Pesky’s Pole, scoring Pedroia and Coco Crisp alongside himself to bring the
Sox within 3 runs of the Rays. In the top of the 8th, Papelbon shut down the bottom
of the Rays lineup in order, and in the bottom half, Jason Bay worked a 4-0 walk
against Dan Wheeler, allowing J.D. Drew to blast a hanging curve over the short
porch in RF. Crisp continued the rally later in the inning with a lengthy at-bat,
blooping a single into RF to score Mark Kotsay from second. Justin Masterson came
in to pitch the 9th, giving up a single and a walk before cleaning up the mess with a
ground ball double play to get out of the jam and kill a Rays rally. J.P. Howell retired
the first two Red Sox hitters in the bottom of the 9th, but gave up an infield single to
Kevin Youkilis, and an intentional walk to Bay. Drew arrived at the plate, and for the
second time that game, came up big with an RBI single over Carlos Pena’s head to
complete one of the biggest post-season comeback victories in the history of the
game, sending the series back to Tampa for Game 6.

7: Nancy Drew Solves the Case of the
Slumping Bat

2007 ALCS Game 6 – Hot on the heels of a dominant Beckett performance in
Game 5 to keep the series alive, the Red Sox came back to the Fenway faithful for
Game 6, hoping for another big win with Curt Schilling on the mound. Facing
another dominant pitcher in Fausto Carmona in the bottom half of the first inning,
Pedroia, Youkilis, and Ortiz worked the bases loaded with none out off two singles
and a walk. Manny Ramirez and Mike Lowell followed up with a strikeout and flyout,
respectively. With the disappointing bat of J.D. Drew coming to the plate, Red Sox
Nation assumed the early rally would be stifled by Carmona and company.
Suddenly, Drew went from being one of Boston’s most disappointing players to being
a fan favourite in a matter of seconds by bashing a high fly ball to deep center field,
giving Grady Sizemore the best seat in the house to watch the beginning of a 12-2
Red Sox rout. In a game that was so far out of hand that even Eric Gagne was
allowed to pitch, Drew drove in a total of 5 runs and the Sox won while facing
elimination once again, forcing a Game 7.

“And with one swing, he erased an entire season filled with frustration, both for
him and these fans here at Fenway.”


– Joe Buck

“[Boston] is not an easy place to not do well, especially when you’re coming in
with some of the fanfare that JD [Drew] came in with but, if he wants to drive in five
again tomorrow, I think he’ll leave on a good note this winter.”


– Terry Francona

JD Drew

6: Angelic Performance

2007 ALDS Game 1 – Everyone knew Beckett could pitch in the postseason.
His Game 6 performance against the Yankees in the 2003 World Series solidified him
as a legendary Yankee killer. However, no one could have expected him to solidify
his post-season dominance against the Angels in arguably the most exciting, and
best, outing of his career. Locked in a pitching duel against John Lackey, Beckett
faced just 31 batters in a complete game shutout, striking out 8 over 108 pitches. In
a battle between two aces, Beckett won the war, and the offense supplied him with 4
runs, although he only needed the 1.

“Man, let me tell ya, some of the innings I watched on T.V. on the screen we have
downstairs … Even on T.V. [Beckett] looked filthy … I mean, he was right on.”


– David Ortiz

Josh Beckett

5: Ramirez Pulls Off a First

2007 ALDS Game 2 – Mike Scioscia clearly preferred to see Manny at the
plate in Game 2 over Big Papi. I guess he felt Papi was Mr. Clutch, and Ramirez was
slumping.  To a degree, he was right. As a result, his pitching staff walked
Ortiz four times (twice intentionally), and took their chances with Ramirez. Prior to
the 9th inning, Ramirez went 0-2 with two walks and a K. However, after Francisco
Rodriguez gave up a lead-off single to Julio Lugo, and intentionally walked Ortiz one
last time, everyone knew something special was coming up. Manny hit the 1-0
pitch over the Monster and out of the park for his first ever walk-off hit in a Red Sox
uniform, giving the Red Sox a 6-3 win, and a 2-0 series lead.

“When you don’t feel good and you still get hits, that’s when you know – you are a
bad man.”


– Manny Ramirez

Manny Ramirez

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/tfLNUWEv8fg&color1=0xcc0000&color2=0xcc1122&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

4: Mr. Clutch Does it Again

2004 ALCS Game 4 – The Red Sox managed to manufacture a run in the 9th
inning to stay alive, but it was up to Papi to ensure there was a Game 5. In the 12th
inning, Paul Quantrill took the mound at Fenway. After a lead-off single by Manny,
Ortiz knocked a Quantrill pitch into the Yankee dugout, walking off for the second
time in just 9 days, and winning the game for the Red Sox, setting up a chance for
Pedro Martinez to relinquish his pride in Game 5.

David Ortiz

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/Iaq4ZA7JBMo&color1=0xcc0000&color2=0xcc1122&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

3: Third Time’s the Charm

2004 ALCS Game 5 – Pedro Martinez was less than stellar, giving up 3 runs
in the 6th and giving up a 2-1 Red Sox lead. The Sox rallied in the bottom of the 8th,
starting with Mr. Clutch’s lead-off home run off Tom Gordon. Later in the inning,
Jason Varitek hit a sac fly to CF, locking the game in a 4-4 tie. Zeroes across the
board until the 14th inning, where after walks to Damon and Ramirez, Ortiz dropped
a 2-out single into CF off Esteban Loaiza, walking off with a win for the second time in
2 games, and the 3rd time in 10 days.

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/A9ZUK4Ci3cM&color1=0xcc0000&color2=0xcc1122&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

2: God Helps Out His #1 Fan

2004 ALCS Game 6 – The miraculous comeback victories in games 4 and 5
were brilliant, but they meant nothing if the Red Sox couldn’t win the next two games.
Those two walk-offs by Ortiz meant nothing if the Yankees stole the momentum at
home. The Red Sox’s World Series dreams relied on Curt Schilling and a severely
injured right ankle. Was Terry Francona crazy to put Schilling on the mound for
Game 6? Apparently not, because with God on his side, Schilling gave up only a
solo home run to Bernie Williams in the 7th. When all was said and done, he struck
out 4 and gave up just 1 run over 7 innings. Ever since, there has been a debate
throughout baseball regarding whether or not his ankle pains were legitimate, or
whether the blood found on his sock was merely a ploy for a good story. However, in
the most important game of his illustrious career, there is no doubt from anyone on
either bench that night in the Bronx that what he had going on was not only real, but
nothing short of divine intervention.

“Tonight it was all God. I knew that I wasn’t going to be able to do this alone. And I
prayed as hard as I could. I didn’t pray to get a win or to make great pitches. I just
prayed for the strength to go out there tonight and compete, and he gave me that. I
can’t explain to you what a feeling it was to be out there and to feel what I felt.”


– Curt Schilling

Curt Schilling

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/zDfNeajJ7WE&color1=0xcc0000&color2=0xcc1122&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

1: The Beginning of the End

2004 ALCS Game 4 – Red Sox fans the world over were depressed. They
were ready to give up. Surely the Curse had won again, right? The Red Sox went
into the 2004 ALCS with something to prove. They were knocked out of the 2003
ALCS by Aaron Boone and the Yankees, and they were adamant that they weren’t
going to let the Bronx Bombers have their way once again. However, the Yankees
took the first two games of the series, putting the Sox in a serious hole, against one
of the best teams ever assembled. They returned to Fenway for Game 3 with hopes
that home turf would give them the spark they needed, but were ousted 19-8. In
Game 4, they fell behind early once again, thanks to an Alex Rodriguez 2-run shot in
the 3rd. 2-0 Yankees. After finally rallying to a 3-2 lead, the Red Sox defense gave
it up the following inning, when the Yankees scored two more. 4-3 Yankees.
Mariano Rivera came out of the ‘pen for the bottom of the 9th, which almost certainly
marked the end of another unfortunate Red Sox season. Mariano ended up giving
up a walk to lead-off batter Kevin Millar, who was replaced for a pinch runner – Dave
Roberts. There was only one reason for bringing in Roberts in this scenario – get to
second, and find a way to get home from there. Everyone in the ballpark knew he
was going to attempt to steal second base. However, that meant Rivera knew as
well. Rivera tried two pick-off attempts, nearly beating Roberts to the bag the second
time. On the first pitch to Bill Mueller, Roberts took the opportunity. Running for his
life, he narrowly beat Jeter’s tag. Mueller then shot the ball up the middle, driving in
Roberts to tie the game and the rest, as any baseball fan knows, is history. During
the short time Roberts was with Boston, he pulled off the greatest stolen base in Red
Sox history, and maybe the most significant stolen base in the history of the game.
Not only did that stolen base spark the Red Sox to win the World Series and end an
86-year drought, but it also effectively marked the end of the Babe’s Curse.


“When we called upon him to do something that maybe seems as minor as
maybe trying to steal a base, you end up seeing … we win a World Series. In my
opinion, that is the number one biggest play.”


– Terry Francona


“The greatest story ever told.”

– John Henry

Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts

http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/5VOV26-nSUc&color1=0xcc0000&color2=0xcc1122&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&fs=1

Thanks for a great decade, Red Sox! Let’s start it all over again in 2010!

I Think I Need An Intervention

I can’t sleep tonight for some reason (I think it’s because Lowell has to go through
surgery, although minor 😦 I’ll have a shot of whiskey for ya this week, hun), so I
decided it would be an ideal time to maybe wrap some Christmas gifts and/or work on
a paper regarding String Theory.

Needless to say, the confines of the inter-web were more appealing than either of
those options, so here I am!

Anyway, the point of all this. I realized just now that I must be in baseball withdrawal.
How did I realize this, you ask? I was listening to iTunes, skipping over songs I didn’t
feel like listening to, and I eventually realized that I have been subconsciously
selecting only songs that are heard regularly at Fenway,  for weeks! Turns out, my 25 most-played songs are all either walk-up / entrance songs of current or former
players, or songs played in between innings. Is there a rehab center for that?

Here’s the list (in no particular order):

  1. Let it Rock – Kevin Rudolf ft. Lil’ Wayne (Jacoby Ellsbury)
  2. **** With Dre Day – Dr. Dre (Dustin Pedroia)
  3. Somos De Calle – Daddy Yankee (David Ortiz)
  4. Man in the Box – Alice in Chains (Kevin Youkilis)
  5. Alive – Pearl Jam (Jason Bay)
  6. Bombtrack – Rage Against the Machine (Mike Lowell)
  7. Kryptonite – 3 Doors Down (Jason Varitek)
  8. Living Hard – Gary Allan (Josh Beckett)
  9. Wild Thing – The Troggs (Jonathan Papelbon)
  10. Rebirthing – Skillet (Justin Masterson)
  11. Stranglehold – Ted Nugent (Daniel Bard)
  12. Rockstar – Nickelback (Josh Beckett)
  13. Stand Here with Me – Creed (Manny Delcarman)
  14. Stronger – Kanye West (Daisuke Matsuzaka)
  15. This is Why I’m Hot – MIMS (David Ortiz)
  16. Shipping up to Boson – Dropkick Murhpys (Jonathan Papelbon)
  17. How Bad do You Want it? – Tim McGraw (Tim Wakefield)
  18. Push It – Rick Ross (Kevin Youkilis)
  19. Cherub Rock – The Smashing Pumpkins (Jacoby Ellsbury)
  20. The Kids Aren’t Alright – The Offspring (Jed Lowrie)
  21. I Use what I Got – Jason Aldean (Jon Lester)
  22. Black Betty – Ram Jam (Mike Timlin)
  23. Tessie – Dropkick Murphys
  24. Sweet Caroline – Neil Diamond
  25. Dirty Water – The Standells

Personally, I can’t wait to add some new music to my playlist in April! Who has a time
machine?